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Comments for Updated AMD by Biomassfreak


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#1

Biomassfreak
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Posted 17 July 2019 - 06:44 PM

This thread was created for comments on this list

#2

ImThatGuyH
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Posted 17 July 2019 - 06:44 PM

get duel channel memory (2x8) and faster speed cause ryzen benefits from faster speed memory

#3

TCJJ
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Posted 19 July 2019 - 03:09 PM

For starters, get a case with better airflow.

Assuming you don't want to wait for Phanteks' mesh cases (should be out in a couple of months or so), better options include the Fractal Design Meshify C, SilverStone Redline RL06, NZXT H500/H510 (the H510 should be available later this month or next; don't bother with the "i" versions), Lian Li PC-O11 Dynamic, or Cooler Master H500 (or H500P Mesh, or the more expensive H500M Mesh if you can find it). Some of the Corsair Crystal series are also good (but some aren't, so be careful).

I'd recommend checking out reviews of cases you're interested in (GamersNexus would be my recommendation for case reviews from a performance standpoint). Also keep in mind that there are different colour options for each case.

 

You could bump your CPU up to a newer Ryzen 3600, which is a much better processor than the 2600, but it also costs another ~$100. I'd say it's worth it, but then again, the 2600 is very cheap right now, so it's your call. Do keep in mind that if you go up to a Ryzen 3000-series processor, you definitely want good airflow - better thermals are crucial for Ryzen gen 3 performance.

 

If you're going to buy a B450 board, stick to MSI. Recommendations would be the MSI B450 Tomahawk, MSI B450-A Pro (original version appears to be discontinued), or MSI B450 Gaming Pro Carbon AC. The cheaper MSI B450 Gaming Plus is also decent, but you're better off spending a bit more to get the Tomahawk.

If you buy a 3000-series CPU now, you'll need an older CPU to update the BIOS, else you'll need BIOS Flashback to do it without a CPU, and MSI's B450 boards all offer BIOS Flashback.

However, if you decide to go with a 3000-series (or, next year, 4000-series) CPU now or in the future, I'd wait until MSI releases their new B450 "Max" revisions, which have a bigger BIOS chip (and should hopefully cause less issues when updating the BIOS) as well as some new features (USB-C on B450 Tomahawk, for example). No release date yet but I imagine they should be out within a month from now.

 

A 550W PSU is probably fine but I'd go up to 650W just in case. This ST65FG v2 from SilverStone is a good PSU for a cheaper price than what you're paying, and you get 100W more out of it. 

 

Don't waste money on a brand new RX 580 - it's not worth it because it's a relatively old card. For the same price or less, you can get Sapphire's RX 590 Nitro+ (or the cheaper Pulse equivalent) from Amazon, shipped (make sure your order including shipping cost doesn't meet/exceed NZ$400 else you'll be taxed), but you could just buy a used RX 570 or 580 instead.

Also, you only need one GPU - you're not going to really benefit from two RX 580s. CrossFire (AMD) and SLI (NVIDIA) is basically dead at this point. If you're set on getting an AMD GPU, I'd recommend you buy a Sapphire card, as they only make AMD cards and so their cards tend to be better than ones from companies such as Gigabyte or ASUS.

With that all being said, for about $400, you can get a NVIDIA GTX 1660 (non-Ti), which is a better card than all the aforementioned cards - I'd recommend just buying one of those instead (EVGA would be a good brand choice - the EVGA GTX 1660 XC Black is a decent card). 

Depending on what you want to spend, you could even bump that up to an RTX 2060 for about $200 more, and you'll get much better performance in return.

 

It's likely you don't need two SSDs, so the 1TB 860 Evo should be more than adequate - you don't really need an M.2 drive unless you're doing tasks that require the fast speeds (such as video editing). If you need more space, you may as well spend the extra money on a 2TB SATA SSD instead (or get a hard drive to with your SSD, if you need more storage without the speed).

 

Finally, Ryzen loves fast RAM - get at least 3000MHz RAM, but preferably 3200MHz or even 3600MHz. You've got four slots and 16GB of RAM is the sweet spot for most users, so getting a kit of 2x8GB sticks will, as ImThatGuyH said, let you run them in dual channel mode (consult the motherboard manual for its best RAM configurations).

Amazon prices are way better for RAM than NZ (same with some GPUs and PSUs, but most cases, motherboards and CPUs are about the same price over here).

I recommend buying either Crucial's Ballistix Sport RAM (white version is currently $115 + shipping) or, if you don't mind spending about another $10, G.Skill's Ripjaws V (F4-3200C16D-16GVKB, specifically) is also good (and may overclock better, though I have yet to test them both side-by-side).

Make sure you enable XMP in BIOS and you'll get optimal performance from your RAM without any manual tuning.

 

Feel free to message me if you have any questions.



#4

LinuxUser
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Posted 19 July 2019 - 05:02 PM

Two comments:

  • The two SSDs and two graphics cards both have one of them set to 0 – it's just two options for the same thing.
  • Both SSDs are M.2, and as long as your mobo supports them, there is no reason to not get that form factor. The thing is, M.2 is just that – where and how it plugs in. Some M.2 SSDs are PCIe / NVMe, but others, including both of those, are SATA.

Other than that, that's all pretty good advice. I probably wouldn't worry too much about the case airflow, because most will be adequate even if they're not perfect. And I wouldn't be too obsessive about fast RAM – yes, Ryzen does like fast RAM, but according to TechPowerUp's benchmarks, it is still only about 5% in most normal situations.


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#5

TCJJ
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Posted 20 July 2019 - 07:11 PM

Two comments:

  • The two SSDs and two graphics cards both have one of them set to 0 – it's just two options for the same thing.
  • Both SSDs are M.2, and as long as your mobo supports them, there is no reason to not get that form factor. The thing is, M.2 is just that – where and how it plugs in. Some M.2 SSDs are PCIe / NVMe, but others, including both of those, are SATA.

Other than that, that's all pretty good advice. I probably wouldn't worry too much about the case airflow, because most will be adequate even if they're not perfect. And I wouldn't be too obsessive about fast RAM – yes, Ryzen does like fast RAM, but according to TechPowerUp's benchmarks, it is still only about 5% in most normal situations.

 

My bad, the product name didn't say M.2 so I assumed the 860 Evo was the SATA SSD variant without looking. Regardless, both aren't needed. 

But regular SATA SSDs are typically cheaper. M.2 is usually more expensive for more speed, especially at 2TB or larger (though in this case, the price difference is ~$2 - then again, the 860 series is also somewhat old, superseded by the 970 series, hence the cheaper price, not that there is enough performance difference to matter for most people). Almost no M.2 drives are SATA these days (and definitely not on AM4 boards), so there's not much point in bringing that up to add to the confusion. 

Something else to consider is that an M.2 in almost every B450 will disable SATA5 and SATA6 ports.

 

I can't say for sure what the zero quantities are though - it's possible OP already owns them, but it's also possible they're just other options for consideration.

 

The difference in price for RAM speed (2400MHz->3000/3200MHz) is negligible (±$20 in most cases) and it definitely makes a difference to Ryzen. 5% is big enough that I would personally care, but again, for the minute difference in price, it's worth it, in my opinion. You don't need to go crazy for 3600MHz b-die or anything like that, but you may as well not waste your money on cheaper stuff when you don't have to.

 

I would definitely worry about case airflow though. Those all-tempered glass cases are hot boxes and are poorly designed (there's a reason Phanteks are re-releasing at least a couple of them - P350(X)->P360X; P400(S)->P400A - with mesh front panels), and that's been proven - there's no point in buying something with poor airflow when you could buy something with good airflow.

If it costs a tad more to keep your $1000+ PC components cooler and therefore give them longer life, it's absolutely worth it.

It's also been proven that Ryzen 3000 is much more temperature-conscious than before, more akin to a GPU. See here. Worth caring about airflow doubly so if you care about Ryzen 3000 or (presuming they work the same) later series.

Finally, you want the GPU to have a lot of breathing room (especially if you buy an AMD GPU), for which a lot of these closed-off cases don't allow.

 

The Phanteks Eclipse P300 in question is especially bad for GPU thermals, and doesn't even include fans (or includes one average one - I've seen mixed reports on this), so for the extra cost of 2 mid-tier fans, you can get a better airflow case with fans include (most include two by default, but some include three).


Edited by TCJJ, 20 July 2019 - 07:19 PM.

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#6

Biomassfreak
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Posted 21 July 2019 - 10:48 PM

Hey thanks for the replies! I made this public to share with a friend, I didn't actually expect any replies. The replies are super helpful, thank you so much for making them. I was so surprised when I saw my build on the bottom left in the forums section. 

 

LinuxUser was right, I had the multiple graphics cards because I was deciding what one to get and I'm only going to get one SSD, then a mechanical in the future. At the moment the m.2 and the SATA are the same price so I'm going to go for the m.2

 

With the RAM and the GPU from Amazon, I'm just going to get the GPU because of the $400 tax limit. I'm pretty stoked that I could get the 590 forthe same price! 

 

This is so hard to decide what to get and the price is getting pretty steep,  my goal was to build a desktop with a Ryzen 5 2600 and an RX 580 from PBTech for under $1300NZD, which is already a lot of money for me and now I'm not sure if this is actually possible in New Zealand. I'm going to stick with the 2600 to keep the price down and so I don't have to get an expensive case.

 

Thank you so much for the replies :) 


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